Wednesday, December 10, 2014

HEARTHSTONE PAINTING

Just out is the new expansion for the World of Warcraft online card game "Hearthstone".

I did the card below, oil on panel, 11X14"



I also found a frame to match the oval format that the cards are played in the game.

This might seem like a minor work but the game has 20 million players and there are only a handful of artists doing original paintings for the game.  One of my goals is to work on projects that have a large fanbase and demand, so this fits the bill, plus it was fun to paint.


Tuesday, July 8, 2014

Interview

Oops... I forgot to mention I was interviewed a few weeks back.  Give it a listen if you want to hear about what freelance fantasy illustrators do.


Friday, July 4, 2014

New stuff.

This month is quite insanely busy, so no time to ramble on.  Here is an assortment of new things that are out recently...





Saturday, June 7, 2014

random stuff...

Here's a recent video interview I did covering my career, from the early Bioware days to my current projects. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kdpzAa1d4NM&feature=share

And from my previous post, here is the 3-d model of the furry dragon s far in its development from the game team.  Looks pretty cool I think.  The fans seem happy.


 



Thursday, June 5, 2014

Zios the Cloudburster


Just unveiled today is my 5th dragon design for the video game "Dragon's Prophet", a fantasy game published by Sony that is popular in Europe.  The client had requested a furry/feathers dragon that the female characters might like to own.

Below is the final design I settled on.  Being a dragon that didn't have the usual "badass, aggressive" look, I decided to make an oil painting to add some narrative to the image of the dragon being wild and difficult to tame, even if somewhat cute.


As with my normal process, the final composition is transferred to the panel with charcoal rubbed on the back of the paper and traced over...


A burnt umber acrylic tracing over the lines makes sure the drawing is not lost...


I use acrylic washes to lay in the basic tones so that I can paint piece-by-piece and visualize each part in context of the whole...


Based on the colors I am using I decide on my oil palette...


Paint background to foreground...



The final painting...


Framed up nicely in a frame I had lying around. 16X20" oil on panel.




Tuesday, April 15, 2014

Battlefield something...

My latest oil painting for Magic the Gathering has been previewed and written up today:

http://www.wizards.com/Magic/Magazine/Article.aspx?x=mtg/daily/rc/295

Battlefield Thaumaturge... I had to look that up and its actually a real word that comes from the Greek for "miracle worker".  See... Magic is educational AND fun.


Looks like the paining is also being used on their packaging.  This is pretty funny to me as the original art order asked for this dude to be shown from the top down and behind leading his army.  I thought looking at a hat and some robes would make a bad image, so I suggested a front view, which they agreed on.  I guess that was a good call as it allowed for this extended usage.
 I didn't capture the entire process for this one, but from my older blog posts you get the idea...

transfer the drawing...

outline the lines with acrylic paint...



Underpainting in acrylic....

Final oil painting..


Thursday, March 27, 2014

Torn Between Heads

Here's a Magic card that has been out for awhile and I didn't know. This card had only one solution... They wanted a guy from a first-person POV with a limb in the mouth of each Hydra head. If you do 2 legs, its a comedy-crotch-shot, and if you do 2 arms you cant see them in your vision if both are outstretched, so there is only one way to do this composition. Pretty limiting description, so just execute.


Tuesday, February 25, 2014

Archon Boneheart

New dragon design for video game: Dragon's Prophet.


Friday, January 24, 2014

Reckless Reveler

Just out is my second original oil painting for Magic: The Gathering, for the upcoming Born of the Gods set.

This one depicts a Satyr Troublemaker gleefully setting a Trojan horse ablaze...


As usual, I rub charcoal to the back of the drawing and trace down onto a panel.  This panel I gessoed myself again, keeping it smooth and slick as I intentionally wanted the paint so go on a bit uneven to get some "free" texture to the application for the rough wood areas.


Going over the lines so that I can see them through the underpainting... This time using a warmer burnt umber.


Establishing the contexts in acrylic washes allows me to paint quickly, completing one area at a time.


 Rendering background to foreground, right to left...


More rendering...

and more...

The final painting...


It seemed like the first painting I posted (Aerie Worshippers), the collectors were keen to see the object finished rather than cropped close. Here is a shot in the frame.  In fact my final photo didn't look nearly as good as it does in person.  I'm still trying to figure out the best-practices for photographing art, and images that have alot of darks and red tones are particularly problematic.  Its very difficult to do these in oils and learn at the same time, as I essentially have to accept a lower standard of quality for the print image due to all these factors.  Going back to digital art is very compellling...


16x20" oil on panel


Thursday, January 16, 2014

First Magic Card illustration in oils: Aerie Worshippers

Just Spoiled for the next Magic set is my first oil-painted card

There is always a bit of trepidation and lack of knowledge of end-results when doing something the first time.  This being my first Magic card oil, I had to guess what size of painting would work to have enough space to render the faces properly and have the right scale for the image and its reduction to tiny card-size.  I went with a fairly large 18X24" format as I thought the subject lended itself to a large, aesthetic painting good for wall decoration and future appreciation outside of the game application.  Not too happy they cropped it in closer, but I guess that underscores why its nice to have originals.


A year ago when I did this I was struggling with getting a good surface, free of priming brushstroke-marks and smooth with some tooth.  I experimented by gessoing my panel and dabbing with a sponge to create a slight stipple and then sanding on top.  I achieved a fine texture that worked well, but have since found pre-primed boards that are the same thing but even better. (and no work!)



After printing out the drawing I rub charcoal to the back and trace over the lines.


The transfer to the board is a bit ugly as the lines migrate and lose their smoothness.  I prefer this extra step to my early process of mounting paper to the panel with clear gesso, as its more archival and won't warp the panel.

I mix a few tints of raw umber acrylic and go over the transferred lines to get a drawing on the board that will be strong and visible as I paint.


Acrylic washes tint the linework and put the whole painting in the right contexts so that I can paint one object at a time, visualizing the final effect from the start.


Painting from back to front, rendering each area at a time...



The final painting is completed and properly photographed...